Thursday, February 21, 2019

10 things to know about your Tot's teeth- from mouthhealthy.org

 

When Teeth Erupt

Your baby is born with 20 teeth below the gums, and they usually start coming through between 6 months and a year. Most children have their full set of teeth by 3 years old. Learn more about what teeth are coming through and when.
 
 

Teething Signs and Symptoms

Teething can be a rite of passage for babies and parents alike. As their teeth come in, some babies may become fussy, sleepless and irritable, lose their appetite or drool more than usual. Diarrhea, rashes and a fever are not caused by teething. If your baby has a fever or diarrhea while teething or continues to be cranky and uncomfortable, call your physician. 
 
 

When to Start Brushing with Toothpaste

Decay can happen as soon as teeth first appear. If you see some pearly whites peeking out when your little one smiles, it's time to pick up a tube of fluoride toothpaste. Find one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance
 
 
 
 

How Much Toothpaste to Use

It doesn't take much to clean your child's teeth. Until you're confident that your child can brush on his or her own, continue to brush your child's teeth twice a day with a child-size toothbrush. If your child is 3 or younger, use a smear of toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice). For children 3 or older, a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste will do. Learn more about establishing healthy habits early.
 

 

When to Schedule Your Baby's First Dental Visit

It's another milestone in a year of exciting firsts. Your child’s first dental visit should take place after their first tooth appears, but no later than the first birthday. Why so early? As soon as your baby has teeth, they can get cavities. Learn more about what to expect and how to prepare for your child’s first dental visit.
 
 
 

When to Start Cleaning Between Teeth

It doesn't matter if you clean between your child's teeth before or after they brush as long as you clean between any teeth that touch. You can use child-friendly plastic flossing tools to more easily clean between your child’s teeth until your child learns to do it.
 
 

You Can Prevent Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Baby bottle tooth decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth (but other teeth may also be affected). Frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar can cause tooth decay. This can happen when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby. 
 
 

Keep Their Mouths Clean

The next time your child’s pacifier goes flying, don’t pick it up and put it in your mouth because you think that makes it cleaner. Cavity-causing bacteria can be passed through saliva, so you could actually be introducing germs to your child instead of protecting him or her from them. The same goes for mealtime. It can be second nature to offer a bite of your food to your baby from your fork or use their spoon to make sure their food is ready to eat. Keep your utensils, and your germs, separate for healthy mouth and body. 
 
 

Water Works!

When your child has worked up a thirst, water is the best beverage to offer—especially if it has fluoride! Drinking water with fluoride (also known as “nature’s cavity fighter”) has been shown to reduce cavities by 25%. While sweetened drinks like fruit juice (even those labeled 100% natural), soda and sports drinks can cause cavities, water with fluoride protects teeth. Sugary drinks also contribute to weight gain, and water is calorie-free. 
 
 
 

There's One More Way to Keep Cavities at Bay

Brushing and flossing go a long way to protecting your teeth against cavities, but sealants form an extra barrier between cavity-causing bacteria and your child's teeth. School-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants. According to the Centers for Disease Control and ADA’s Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry, sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars.
 
 
 
 

6 ways to reduce Sugar in snacks

When working with her young patients, pediatric dentist and ADA spokesperson Dr. Mary Hayes teaches them this simple, but important, saying: “Sugar is fun to eat, but not good for your teeth!”

That’s because your child might love sweet treats, but the bacteria in his or her mouth loves them even more. “Sucrose (sugar) is the ‘food’ for the bacteria that cause tooth decay,” Dr. Hayes says. “Those bacteria produce acid that etches away the teeth.”

Limiting the amount of sugar your entire family eats is good for your teeth and key to your overall health. Here are some dentist-recommended ways to start saying good-bye to unnecessary sugar throughout the day.

Know the Limits

When choosing a snack, keep an eye on added sugar (sweeteners like corn syrup or white sugar that are added to prepared foods). Naturally occurring sugars are less worrisome, as they are found in healthy choices like milk and fruit.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that people age 3 and older should consume no more than 12.5 tsp. each day of added sugar. (The same as one can of soda.) The World Health Organization states that adults should consume no more than 6 tsp. of added sugar, and children should have no more than 3 tsp.

When reading labels, you’ll see sugar is listed in grams. Since 1 tsp. of sugar equals 4 grams, aim to make sure the foods you are feeding your child fall between 12 to 50 grams a day.

The Truth About Juice

Because juice is high in sugar and calories, water and milk are always the best options for your little one. In fact, if your child is under 1 years old, the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests completely removing juice from his or her diet.

Older children can occasionally drink juice, but if they do, there are two things to remember:
  • Children ages 1-6 should have no more than 4-6 oz. of juice each day, according to pediatric guidelines. Children ages 7 to 18 should drink no more than 8-12 oz. (Many juice boxes are about 6 oz., so younger children should have no more than one per day, and older children no more than two.)
  • Allowing your child to sip on juice throughout the day puts him or her at higher risk for tooth decay because you’re giving that cavity-causing bacteria more opportunities to eat and produce the acid that eats away at teeth. This can also happen with juice that is watered down. “Even though the volume of sugar has decreased, you’ve added the time that it takes to drink it,” says ADA spokesperson Dr. Jonathan Shenkin.
So what’s a parent to do? Limit the amount of juice your children drink, and always offer water or milk first. If your child does drink juice, serve the recommended, age-appropriate limits at mealtimes only. When your family is done eating, clean up any leftover juice instead of letting your children leave the table with it.

Skip the Soda

Call it soda, call it pop. But sugary, carbonated beverages by any name are bad news for your child’s teeth. “One can of soda is the amount of sugar recommended for three days for a child,” Dr. Hayes says.

In fact, a February 2016 study in the Journal of the American Dental Association found a strong association between sugary drinks and poor dental health in teenagers. Researchers asked teens 14-19 in Mexico about how many sugary beverages they drank, then examined their teeth. They found 31.7% had tooth erosion, which means their enamel had been eaten away. The main culprit? Soda.

Be Picky About Sticky Snacks

If you’ve been under the impression that gummy or sticky fruit snacks are healthy alternatives, you’re not alone. Many parents are surprised to learn they are really closer to candy than fruit, especially when it comes to sugar. “Fruit rollups and other dried fruit snacks are like nature’s candy,” Dr. Shenkin says. “It is like candy, but in some respect it’s worse than candy because it sticks to teeth longer than things like milk chocolate, which is easier to wash away.”

Foods like raisins, which are often promoted as an all-natural snack option, can be troublesome. “The raisin is one of the worst foods because they’re so sticky and they actually adhere to teeth and stay there for an extended amount of time,” he says. “The sugar in that food is being consumed by the bacteria in our mouth during that time.”

Serve Carbs with Care

Whether it’s the crunch or the fact that they’re shaped like their favorite animals, kids love crackers and chips. The truth? “Many crackers are cookies with salt,” Dr. Hayes says. Not only do the carbohydrates in things like crackers and chips break down into sugar, they also tend to get stuck in the tops of your teeth for long periods of time.

Set an Example

You’d do anything for your kids. Now, are you ready to do all of the above for yourself too? Dr. Shenkin says setting an example can make a big difference in your whole family’s health. Eat well, brush twice a day for two minutes and clean between your teeth once a day. “If you want to change your child’s habits, it isn’t just about what they do,” he says. “Do the same thing with them.”

More from MouthHealthy


February Calendar

February 2019

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday




1
Show And Tell

4

5
 Chinese New Year-Story of Nian
A Chinese New Year story
6
Art: Color a Dragon
7
Stomp and Shout
8
Show And Tell

Teaching strategies
Stop & Go

11
Craft-Bee Mine Valentine
12
Rhyme- 

I Like Heart
13
Valentine Heart Math
14

15
Show And Tell
Talk about President day

18
Closed


19
Theme:National Children Dental Health Month


20
Craft-Sad Tooth
Happy Tooth
21

Song-
Brush your teeth up and down
22
Show And Tell

Game-Race to lose a teeth a counting game

25
Activity-Flossing activity







26
Story- 
Happy teeth Healthy kids
27
Song- 
Brush your tooth up and down
28
Stomp And Shout 

Science-Exploring a tooth


Game- Race to lose a teeth a counting game







Wednesday, October 10, 2018

New Enrichment program has started



We will have Music and movement by " Stomp and Shout" 2 times a month on Thursday mornings. You are welcome to come, sit and join in.  Next visit is Tomorrow October 11th at 9:30am

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STOMP AND SHOUT IS HERE


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Founded in 2013, Stomp and Shout Chicago believes that learning can (and should) be fun. Our mission is to innovate inspiring and challenging ways to bring music, imagination, and art to kids and their families.
Our programming encourages creative thinkers, laying the ground work for high self-esteem, strong team work,problem solving, and big, beautiful imaginations


Hello Families!
I hope to meet all of you in person very soon. We are thrilled to be joining your children's educational journey at Diana'sDaycare Center. As you're aware, this is a very special place...from the moment we walked through the doors we knew it was going to be a perfect fit for our program. Below is some information about the Stomp and Shout Program.
All of our music and poems are original (straight from our brains!), we change session material every 10-12 weeks. You'll receive music downloads and a Play At Home Packet at the start of each session. We encourage you to listen at home and PLAY with your little one (don't worry they'll show you how it's done). If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to ask!

All The Best -
Cassie Slater CoFounder/Director of Education


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